Wednesday, 19 February 2020

Deer friends and snowshoes

Sunday and Monday I went walkies. Snowshoes are a must!



Coyote tracks across the frozen wetland.



The frogpond! 

The wood duck nesting boxes are waiting for the duckies.



This is the frog pond from up the hill to the house.



This is an April view! Spring is coming, I am sure.



And in May, glorious May!



This is a 360 ˚ view of the wetland. It's so peaceful. It's not truly forest walkies, AKA forest bathing, I guess, but it is such a lovely spot in the quiet, with the chickadees singing in the trees. The snow is really crunchy under my feet.




Tuesday, Feb. 18th, a snowstorm. They forecast 15 cm, but we had barely 3! And some rain...



JB had 14 deer and 15 turkeys. The bird feeder was a busy spot. If you look under the evergreen tree, you can see a couple of turkeys sheltering from the snow.

11 comments:

Tom said...

...I often wonder how the deer move through the deep snow with their small huffs.

R's Rue said...

Beautiful photos. 😀

Nancy J said...

I finally found the chickadee when he flew off. I'm sure those deer know where any feed has dropped off, and more snow, hope you do not have to venture out on the roads today. I will check our April diary, ahah, not as if we have lots or any list of appointments, so that should fit in well for us to go down and meet the family, other than on Facetime or your blog, Real life would be amazing.

https://linsartyblobs.blogspot.com said...

The coyote tracks remind me of flowers

Christine said...

Oh Spring, come soon!

Karen said...

Any time I walk on the Bush trails I consider it forest bathing. At least we aren't going to be plagued by ticks at these temperatures!

eileeninmd said...

Wow, so many tracks, Love the cute snow covered deer.
Wishing you a happy day!

Ontario Wanderer said...

I have yet to use my snowshoes this winter. Our snow comes and goes too quickly.

Lowcarb team member said...

Such fabulous photographs.

All the best Jan

David M. Gascoigne, said...

I don't even have snowshoes any more, but I seldom walk in areas where I would need them. In deep snow they are essential as you well know, Jenn. Just another great idea adopted from the First Nations people.

William Kendall said...

The critters look quite at home.