Thursday, 29 November 2012

TVOntario Video: End-of-life care

Forgive me for calling attention to myself, however, end-of-life for those living in poverty can be incredibly difficult for the care recipient, family, friends and neighbours. I was honoured to be interviewed by TVOntario. I never fail to be shocked with the way frontline healthcare workers, called Primary Care, can ignore dire needs, failing health of home care clients, self-abuse, citing policy and the Freedom of Information Protection and Privacy Act (FIPPA) vs. the Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA).

End-of-life care for those in poverty
Streamed live on Nov 28, 2012 Hospice volunteer Jennifer Jilks describes what end of life care is like for those below the poverty line, and, what changes can be made to improve health care for the poor. 

5 comments:

W. Latane Barton said...

you go girl... so glad someone is taking up the cause and giving hope.

W. Latane Barton said...

you go girl... so glad someone is taking up the cause and giving hope.

Kay said...

This is great, Jenn! Thank you for shining the spotlight onto this sad situation. I know it's difficult in the U.S. also.

Red said...

There's certainly a long way to go with end of life care. The big issue here this week was the one bath a week policy. One feels so good after a bath and why they can't see that people benefit from a bath I don't know. One of the hissy fits my Dad had was that about 2:00 AM one night he wanted a bath. He was quite blind and had no idea what the time was.

Jennifer A. Jilks said...

The reason for weekly baths, Red, is time and staff. It takes a long time to bath one resident, especially those who require a two-person or mechanical lift.
One of the biggest expenses in long-term care is staffing. They barely have enough staff for all the ADLs a failing senior requires.